Blog

  1. Ready for WDYTYA Live 2016

    It’s that time of year again when the world of family history descends on the NEC in Birmingham for the Who Do You think You Are? Live show. This year promises to be as good as ever with a wide range of talks both in the Society of Genealogist’s workshops, in the DNA arena and also at various other venues around the exhibition hall.

    On Thursday and Friday I have two daily talks. The first, Unique and Essential Online Sources, takes place at 11.15  at The Genealogist’s Talk Stand  (306).  I shall be looking at some of the less commonly used but essential online sources, notably tithe records. Later in the day I will look at  how to make sure your family tree is accurate by enhancing your research technique. This is a 20 minute talk entitled The Golden Rules at 2.50 pm in the Education Zone.

    On Saturday my Unique and Essential Online Sources talk takes place at 2 pm followed by my talk on Tracing a 16th and 17th Century Family Tree at 3.15 pm in SOG 2. Here I will look at some of the sources that will help you find out more about your family and extend your pedigree in a period where information is often harder to come by.

    Meanwhile  my 2014 article on probate inventories at  has just been made available online by Family Tree Magazine and is free for all to read.

    I hope to see you there!

  2. Time to Improve Online Coverage Details

    It is my opinion that genealogy websites should provide full source details and coverage dates for each of their databases. They should also clearly state where a database is not yet complete.

    While there is a wealth of genealogical and historical data now available online courtesy of websites such as Findmypast, Ancestry, TheGenealogist and FamilySearch it is becoming increasingly difficult to accurately determine what exactly the various databases include and, in some cases where they came from, thanks to the inadequate or inconsistent detailing of their sources.

    This is caused by several factors but the main two are as follows.

    • A lack of information as to where the information came from and the coverage dates and any gaps within the coverage. Source data should be clearly visible for anyone using the database or at least for anyone who wishes to make the effort to check the details.

    • Inaccurate or unhelpful title names indicating complete coverage where coverage is not in fact complete are misleading.

    Let us take parish registers as an example. Neither Ancestry nor Findmypast has a complete county-by-county listing of what they hold. If I am searching for a missing baptism, burial or marriage I need to know exactly which parishes for a certain county or counties are available online and for which dates. Once I know this I can work out which are not and will potentially have to be searched in the record office. However, since neither company provides a county-by-county listing of which parish registers they hold it’s not easy to check this.

    I emailed Findmypast to ask if they had such a listing on their website as I know that they do sometimes issue such lists when new databases are released. This is the reply I received:

    ‘We are sorry but the website does not have a full list of coverage for the parish registers. You would have to check the search form for the parish and then carry out a blank search. Once you have done this you can change the results page by clicking the sort order at the top right – relevance. If you change this to ascending/descending you will see the years covered.’

    This seems a very long-winded way of established county coverage, especially when they must have such listings in existence! Ancestry collections are better detailed but they still have no means of checking county coverage in one go. Similarly, the Family Search Wiki is a quite good way of determining which parishes have online coverage, but I don’t believe this is entirely up-to-date and this is again not as useful as a county-by county- listing, as each parish has to be searched individually to determine online coverage.

    To my knowledge the only major commercial website to offer a county-by-county listing for parish registers is TheGenealogist which has its ‘List of all datasets’ at the bottom of its home and search pages. This provides a full list of which parish registers it offers and the coverage dates for each type of event and, for logged in users, this can also be accessed from the ‘Search’ tab, entitled ‘What’s included in my subscription?’ The list naturally covers all its other datasets too, not just parish registers, although some of the other categories are not as detailed as they should be.

    In order to prevent the online world of genealogical sources descending into chaos, I call upon the major genealogy companies to make it quite clear what information their datasets do and do not include. Surely this is not too much to ask?

    If you would like to join me in my campaign to encourage companies to improve the quality of their sourcing details and a new openness about which records they do and do not offer, please spread the word and encourage those interested in family history to email the companies concerned as well with this simple request. Let’s start with a request for full county-by-county parish register listings. Please share my blog with the genealogy world  and you can also follow my posts on the subject on Twitter @CeliaHeritage and Facebook. Your examples of inadequate source detailing and coverage are most welcome.

  3. The King Family of Ivychurch

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    The King gravestone temporarily raised last year

    As part of my one place study of Ivychurch in Kent (where I live) I have come to know some inhabitants of the churchyard better than others. Some, such as William Bates, whose grave I can see from my office window and who left 55 grandchildren behind him, seem to have descendants scattered all round the world and I have had several emails from them this year alone! Others grab my attention for other reasons, such as William Kennett King and his wife Louisa. During our churchyard survey last year theirs was one of two stones which had been recumbent for many years and which we managed to raise temporarily to read and photograph. It is an irony that since William and Louisa’s stone had fallen face down, the writing on it was well preserved. Had it fallen the other way this would not have been the case.
    William Kennett King was born in nearby Kenardington in 1867. Although his father was a labourer, William trained as a grocer and by the 1891 census appears in Appledore, just a few miles from Ivychurch, working as a grocer’s assistant. He married Louisa Orman from Ivychurch in 1894 and the couple had two children, Olive and Mabel. By 1911 William and his family had moved to Ivychurch where William was working in his own right as a grocer and draper while both he and Louisa were running the sub- post office at Kent House.
    Sadly their daughter Mabel died in 1919, aged 22, and just a few years later in 1922 both William and Louisa died – within four days of each other! The parish registers show that William was buried on 18th January and Louisa on the 23rd. Receiving an email from one of the King family members I learnt that rumours in the wider family told that Louisa had committed suicide. Seeking the truth behind this tale, I bought her death certificate. Although the death certificate of someone who took their own life will not necessarily record the death as ‘suicide’, an indicator would be that the coroner’s name would be given in the column for the informant and the death would have been subject to an inquest. The date and place of the inquest will also be noted on the certificate from 1875.
    The certificate showed that in actual fact Louisa died from diabetes, from which she had had for two years and four months. She fell into a coma 33 hours before she died and there cannot have been any suspicious circumstances, because there was not even a post mortem. She was 47 years old. It may be the case that once William died she lost the will to live and this may be where the rumours of suicide began.
    Before we leave the Kings, however, another lesson can be learnt, this one regarding accuracy of dates and ages on gravestones and in other sources. William’s age at death is given as 53 in the burial register, on the gravestone and also on the 1911 census. Checking the GRO birth index it was, however, 1867. His daughter Mabel, who is recorded on the same gravestone, has her age given as 23 years, although in the burial records it states 22 years. Checking the GRO birth index again it is probable that she had not reached her 23rd birthday when she died, as her birth was registered in the final quarter of 1896. It is almost certain that Mabel’s sister Olive raised the stone in memory of her family, possibly some years after their deaths because Mabel’s death is the last one mentioned despite the fact that she died first. Olive must have got her father’s age wrong and forgotten that her sister had not had her birthday in the year she died. So bear in mind that any source can be subject to inaccuracies.

  4. 1931 Census

    Many of you will know that the English and Welsh 1931 census returns were destroyed during WW11. What many people do not realise, however, is that this was not as a result of enemy action but caused by a ferocious fire which mysteriously broke out in a store room at the Office of Works one night in December 1942. The devastation was so great that, in the words of W. A. Derrick, the member of staff who reported the loss, it left behind ‘’nothing more than shapeless mounds of paper” making any attempt at salvage “useless”. The hearts of all family historians reading this will no doubt just have shuddered in horror!
    Mr Derrick worryingly also stated in his report (written to a colleague at the Central National Registration Office at Southport) “Will you also let us know where the enumeration books and plans of division relating to the 1921 census are stored. The schedules, as you are aware, were damaged by water at Leonard Street and have since been dried out and are scattered over various parts of Somerset House; but no plans or enumeration books were brought from Leonard Street and it is assumed that they were stored elsewhere.”
    Thankfully archival storage arrangements are now far superior to the arrangements of the 1940s and, putting it into some historical perspective, few people today would consider a documentary source of a mere twenty year’s age to be that important! However I still can’t help casting a swift backwards curse in time at the fate of these records and the fact that no-one thought to separate the census books from the householders’ schedules when they were stored away. At least the Scottish returns were housed safely in Edinburgh!

  5. Farewell to Cumbria

     

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    Appleby St Lawrence

    For the last week my husband and I have been relaxing on holiday post-WDYTYA! Our favourite place is Cumbria, where we both have long established roots and, although we were staying in Appleby-in-Westmorland, as usual we ended up roaming all over the county from East to West, North to South (Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North of the Sands – with bit of Lancashire proper too!) – walking, relaxing and exploring churches and churchyards. Just what I needed after after all the work involved in preparing for WDYTYA.

    Celia

    Celia Heritage

    I also spend time in both Kendal and Carlisle Record Offices searching for my own ancestors in manorial records. My visit to Carlisle RO was my first since its relocation and I was very impressed! A lovely purpose built, yet tasteful, building with efficient knowledgeable staff and even car parking! A rare treat these days. My only gripe with Cumbria Archives is that if they had to reduce opening hours to four days a week why must all the record offices shut on the same day (Monday)? A real pain if you are visiting for a week and want to carry out some serious research. At least closing some on Mondays and some on Fridays, for example, would give the non-local researcher a better opportunity to utilise all his or her time.

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    Lamplugh churchyard

    Some other highlights of our holiday were churchyards at Lamplugh where many of the older gravestones are wonderfully preserved such as the one shown here for Margaret Burnyeat who died, aged 72, in 1724 ; also Moresby on the West Coast – an impressive church standing near the cliff edge looking across to Scotland and surrounded again by many well-preserved graves, many marking those killed in the local mines.

    We took our fond farewell of Cumbria a couple of days ago to return home to Kent. Hopefully we will be back ‘up North’ before too long.

    Moresby

    Moresby churchyard

  6. WDYTYA – A week on and the first set of photos!

    My eight talks over and now just over a week on from WDYTYA Live 2015 I am now pleasantly relaxed after several days off! Here are some mementos of three very enjoyable and successful days.

    Apart from some acoustic problems in my talk How Far Did Your Ancestor Travel on Thursday (caused by the fact that the NEC microphone headset in SOG 2 did not adjust down small enough to fit my head!) all my talks ran smoothly, were well-attended and very well-received.

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    Tweet-up No 1!

    The highlights of the exhibition for me were my final talk on the Saturday in SOG 1, which was packed with over 270 people, and catching up with friends and colleagues in our many ‘tweet-ups’ and evening ‘genie’ gatherings. Also the fact that my health is now so greatly improved from a year ago. Last year I had to take regular breaks back at my hotel in order to carry out all my commitments and during my seventh talk on day three I can remember wondering  whether I would make it to the end with out passing out! At that time I had just been diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, a disease of the connective tissues, which was leaving me increasingly exhausted and in almost constant pain. Thankfully, following my diagnosis, I was lucky to receive some very supportive treatment from a great physio and also CBT pain therapy. A year later, following an intensive exercise routine,I find myself so much fitter and stronger –  and by talk number eight this year I was still enjoying myself! I could not have been more pleased!

    Genie Meal!

    If you could not make the NEC, I will be giving my talks I’ve Lost My Ancestor Before 1837 and How Far Did your Ancestor Travel again on 30 May in Petersfield, Hampshire as part of a one day seminar with Les Mitchinson. For further details see http://www.mitchinsongenealogy.com/tuition/course-dates.Handouts for all my talks are also now available: those for TheGenealogist at www.thegenealogist.co.uk/celia and those for the Society of Genealogists (along with handouts from many other speakers) at www.sog.org.uk.

  7. Ready for WDYTYA Live NEC!

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    Tomorrow sees the first day of the hugely popular WDYTYA Live Family History show and this year, for the first time, the venue is the NEC in Birmingham.

    I arrived at the NEC at lunchtime and spent some time exploring the venue which is in Hall 2 of the NEC. Unlike Olympia the hall is on one level but it is well laid out and there is easy access from both the airport and train stations.

    The picture below will give you an insight into the amount to work that goes into each exhibition and at 4pm on Wednesday the hall is still being transformed into tomorrow’s show ground!

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    Meanwhile I am prepared to give eight talks in total – twice daily for TheGenealogist on stall 500 where at 12 0′ clock and 2pm each day  I will be talking about (among other things) tithe records and apprentice records, and other occupational sources. At 3.15 on Thursday I am speaking on migration within the UK for our pre-19th century ancestors in the SOG 2 arena. You may be surprised at just how far your ancestors travelled before this date and this may account for many of your ‘missing’ ancestors. At 3.45 on Saturday my last talk (SOG1) will look at how to trace those missing ancestors before 1837. In between you can pick up copies of the revised edition of my book Tracing Your Ancestors Through Death Records at the Pen and Sword stand (402).

    All set and ready to go! Roll on tomorrow!

  8. Welcome to my new website

    Welcome to my new website which has been fully redesigned with details of all my latest research, talks and online courses.